History

Honors U.S. History 1 and 2
  • Engages students in a rigorous examination of U.S. history
  • Requires a strong interest in US History and a good understanding of the national story 
  • Demands a significant amount of nightly reading for which students will held accountable

AP U.S. History
  • Focuses on developing students’ understanding of American history from approximately 1491 to the present
  • Introduces students to some of the major themes, events, and people that together comprise the history of the United States of America
  • Asks students to begin to think like a historian, seeking a deeper understanding of the human condition through asking challenging questions, analyzing primary and secondary source material, making historical comparisons, reasoning chronologically, and making salient arguments
  • Requires students to respond thoughtfully to complex and challenging historical problem
  • Proceeds chronologically with coverage of many of the major themes and events in the nation’s history
  • Emphasizes working with primary source documents

U.S. History 1: Dissent and the American Identity
  • Examines historical fiction, documentaries, letters, diaries, photographs and speeches that shed light on the people who have shaped our history
  • Provides an in-depth look into the evolution of political structures and parties up until 1877 in the United States.
U.S. History 1: Power and Politics in the Shaping of the United States

  • Provides an in-depth look into the evolution of political structures and parties up until 1877 in the United States

U.S. History 1: To the Constitution and Beyond
  • Explores the steps taken to build the US Constitution
  • Examines key moments in American history where the Constitution was tested as well as the emergence of political parties, judicial review, key elections, and the consequences of expansion

U.S. History 2: Modern America: A Cultural Journey
  • Studies the evolution of American culture by examining important moments in time and also the painting, music, creative writing, and poetry that emerged along the way

U.S. History 2: Securing Our Rights
  • Studies the interpretation and application of the ideals put forth by our nation’s founders throughout the 20th century

U.S. History 2: America: A Global Perspective
  • Examines how America has come to be what it is today through interactions with other nations and how it has in turn become an important force in changing other cultures
  • Brings Native American history front and center to focus on the dynamic complexity and rich traditions of Native American culture
  • Examines Native American culture in its own right
  • Develops an understanding of the relationship of Native Americans to other American groups (both contemporary and modern)
  • Examines the varied and rich traditions of many Native-American tribes
  • Develops an understanding, through literature, art, myth, film, and history, of Native American culture for its beauty and its resiliency in the face of tragedy and destruction

A Truly American Story: A Close Examination of Native American History
  • Brings Native American history front and center to focus on the dynamic complexity and rich traditions of Native American culture
  • Examines Native American culture in its own right
  • Develops an understanding of the relationship of Native Americans to other American groups (both contemporary and modern)
  • Examines the varied and rich traditions of many Native-American tribes
  • Develops an understanding, through literature, art, myth, film, and history, of Native American culture for its beauty and its resiliency in the face of tragedy and destruction
"Good Morning, Vietnam"

  • Explores the experiences of both Americans and Vietnamese in the Vietnam War
  • Through guest speakers, document and film analysis, and a range of activities, explores how Americans and Vietnamese responded to this significant conflict in the Cold War
  • Examines what was going on in the jungles of Southeast Asia, on college campuses and in homes in the United States and Vietnam during this controversial conflict.


Human Rights in History and Action
  • Considers questions like: Is clean water a human right? What does global poverty have to do with me? Is our criminal justice system really just? What can I do about the refugee crisis?
  • Investigates through reading, research, and seminar discussion the history of human rights through case studies of key issues
  • Explores human rights issues close to home through a community-based project
  • Concludes with student-designed projects on a contemporary human rights issue or campaign

Mexico: Beyond the Border
  • Allows students to cross the border and explore a land that is rich with history and culture
  • Examines how the country has come to shape its social, political and national identity – including current debates of “Mexicaness” and how Mexicans view the United States
  • Studies historical texts, literature, art, film, and projects to understand the complexity, beauty and relevance of Mexico

The 1990s and the Shaping of the 21st Century
  • Studies the key events, mostly abroad, that helped shaped the first years of the new millennium
  • Examines war, multiple genocides, conflict resolution, peace, transitional justice, financial trends, and current sources of tension will be examined
  • Requires tudents to participate in group collaborations, problem solving, cultural analysis, evaluation of sources and special projects

The Story of Me
  • Enables students to delve into their family’s roots, culture, traditions and experiences through geneological research and to dig into the larger histories of nations and time periods much different than our own
  • Commingles American and world histories while examining noticeable periods of migration and immigration
  • Requires students to write both historically and creatively, engage inmulti-media projects, capture oral history, research, present, and engage in field work

World Religions: From Shamans to Jedi, In Search of Sacred Space
  • Investigates the history and philosophy of world religions from Shamanism to Scientology through an exploration of art, social constructions, and points of conflict
  • Using the lab model of student driven investigation, compares religious practice through ritual, myth, experiential, social, doctrinal, ethical, and material elements
  • Develops the tools to objectively discuss and critically examine the religious experience in cultures around the world and throughout history
  • Explores how religions have evolved and how they reflect the cultures they inhabi
  • Requires students to take on a teaching role to inform the class how personal implicit and explicit religious perspectives impact the way they navigate the world

World Religions: From Shamans to Jedi, In Search of Sacred Space
  • Compares religious practice through ritual, myth, experiential, social, doctrinal, ethical and material elements
  • Develops the tools to objectively discuss and critically examine the religious experience in cultures around the world and throughout history

You Have Nothing to Lose but Your Chains: Socialism – Past and Present
  • Explores questions including: What exactly is socialism? Is socialism on the rise in the U.S., and if so, is that a good idea? If socialism is about equality, how has it ended up justifying human rights abuses in countries like North Korea? What is the difference between socialism, communism, and democratic socialism?
  • Studies the history of socialism from the 19th to the 21st century
  • Opens with the philosophical and political origins of socialist thought in the 19th century with an emphasis on Marxism
  • Examines historical case studies of socialism in practice that might range from communist states such as the Soviet Union and The People’s Republic of China, to Scandinavian social democracies
  • Concludes with a research unit that allows students to pursue contemporary or historical topics of their choice
Intensives

America: A Global Perspective
  • Examines how America has come to be what it is today through interactions with other nations, how it has in turn become an important force in changing other cultures, and what it means to be American in an increasingly globalized society

The Capital “D” – An Exploration of the History and Culture of the Deaf
  • Engages students in the long standing debate around the deaf community and Deaf rights 
  • Addresses the major social reforms of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, such as the creation of American Sign Language (ASL), as well as the educational, cultural, political, and economic issues confronting the D/deaf both past and present
  • Explores the studies of linguistics, education, sociology, and psychology
  • Includes a critical analysis of D/deaf history, a student-directed pursuit of research, and project-based learning that partners with local deaf and auditory institutions and individuals

A Healthy Organism: Redesigning Cleveland through Equitable Urban Planning
  • Explores the historical development of Cleveland through a cultural, political, and design lens
  • Unpacks the use of public and private space as they pertain to human needs and equitable living
  • Delves into the history of some of the world’s most iconic cities while engaging with local experts who help make Cleveland function
  • Investigates what isn’t working for those who call Cleveland home and examines the effects of policies that have historically divided American cities
  • Includes a challenge to redesign elements of Cleveland in order to address the equity and sustainability issues facing 21st-century urban environments by partnering with different community organizations, local agencies, and national firms

Presidential Election 2020: By Electoral or Popular Vote?
  • Addresses the democratic process behind US Presidential elections, as based on the US Constitution, as well as Congressional and Senate elections at the federal and state levels
  • Uses mathematics to analyze claims about political phenomena and to measure how “democratic” our democracy really is – or isn’t
  • Provides on-site experiences in voter registration with the Cuyahoga County Board of Elections and the League of Women’s Voters
  • Includes a trip to the State Capitol in Columbus will provide the opportunity to meet with Ohio electoral college members

Holocaust History and Memory: Germany and Poland - International Travel (11 nights)
  • Includes travel to Germany and Poland to study the history and memory of the Holocaust
  • Explores, through visits to memorials and museums and in meetings with survivors and rescuers, the ongoing struggles in the two countries to come to terms with past and memorialize the Holocaust

The Identity Project: Exploring Diversity and Social Justice in the 21st Century
  • Examines how social identities in the United State, particularly race, ethnicity and class, were created historically, and how they influence our individual and communal experiences in a complex world;
  • Includes attendance at the National Association of Independent Schools Annual Student Diversity Leadership Conference

9/11 in a Global Context (Global Online Academy)
  • Explores the causes of 9/11, the events of the day itself, and its aftermath locally, nationally, and around the world

Advanced Topics in Economics (Global Online Academy)
  • Explores current events through an economic lens and analyzes how the presence of scarcity affects the behaviors of individuals, businesses, and governments

Applying Philosophy to Modern Global Issues (Global Online Academy)
  • Connects pressing contemporary issues with broad-range philosophical ideas and controversies drawn from multiple traditions and many centuries
  • Examines how thinkers have applied reason successfully and unsuccessfully to many social and political issues across the world

Climate Change and Global Inequality (Global Online Academy)
  • Examines the causes and effects of climate change and the public policy debates surrounding it
  • Includes participating in GOA’s Catalyst Conference in spring 2019, where students will present their individual projects to spark change in local communities through well-informed activism

Comparative Politics (Global Online Academy)
  • Uses comparative model to ask students to consider whether democracy is, in fact, at a standstill - and if and why we should care

Entrepreneurial Leadership (Global Online Academy)
  • Combines a rich summer immersion experience at African Leadership Academy’s residential campus in Johannesburg, South Africa, followed by a 15-week online component offered through Global Online Academy that extends the foundational skills gained during the residential program to real-world concerns within each student’s local community

Entrepreneurship in a Global Context (Global Online Academy)
  • Develops an understanding of entrepreneurship in today’s global market
  • Employs innovation, design, and creative solutions for building a viable business model
  • Teaches students to develop, refine, and pitch a new start-up

Gender Studies (Global Online Academy)
  • Uses the concept of gender to examine a range of topics and disciplines that includes feminism, gay and lesbian studies, women’s studies, popular culture, and politics

Introduction to Investments (Global Online Academy)
  • Simulates work of investors by working with the tools, theories, and decision-making practices that define smart investment; explores concepts in finance and applies them to investment decision in portfolio management, venture capital, and social investing

Macroeconomics (Global Online Academy)
  • Teaches students to better understand how to measure national economic activity with concepts like gross domestic product, unemployment, and inflation and the strengths and weaknesses of these statistics

Microeconomics (Global Online Academy)
  • Deepens understanding of basic microeconomic theory
  • Teaches students about how consumers and producers interact to form a market as well as how and why the government may intervene in that market

Prisons and Criminal Law (Global Online Academy)
  • Familiarizes students with the legal rules and institutions that determine who goes to prison and for how long
  • Offers a concrete, practical understanding of legal communication and reasoning while grappling with mass incarceration as a legal, ethical, and practical issue
Back
An independent, coeducational, college preparatory day school, toddler through grade 12

Lower & Middle Schools, 5000 Clubside Rd, Lyndhurst, OH 44124
Birchwood School of Hawken, 4400 West 140th Street, Cleveland, OH 44135 

Upper School, PO Box 8002 (12465 County Line Rd), Gates Mills, OH 44040
Mastery School of Hawken, 11025 Magnolia Dr, Cleveland, OH 44106

Gries Center, 10823 Magnolia Dr, Cleveland, OH 44106

Directions  |  Log in  |  440-423-4446