Mastery School of Hawken

Hawken School is pleased to announce the expansion of our campus in University Circle with the purchase of five additional properties on Magnolia Drive and the launch of the Mastery School of Hawken in August 2020.
 
This new high school will build on Hawken’s experiential curriculum, offering problem-based learning opportunities within steps of our neighbors in University Circle and Glenville and expanding our partnerships with many of the most engaging and innovative cultural, educational, arts, and medical institutions in the world. Click here to see a list of University Circle Inc.'s partners. 


Why is Hawken launching a new high school?

For more than a decade, Hawken faculty have created nationally recognized programs that place students in the real world and engage them in solving authentic problems. 
 
The Mastery School of Hawken will take this innovative programming to scale. With the expansion of our campus in University Circle, students will now have the opportunity to immerse themselves fully in this transformative approach to learning.
 
Research confirms that students learn best -- and are healthiest -- when they are active participants partnering with talented faculty on work that matters. 
 
The Mastery School of Hawken will promote intellectual breakthroughs and authentic engagement that will inspire students to become citizens of consequence in the world they will inhabit.

How does the "school within a school" benefit all Hawken students?

The Mastery School of Hawken’s structure will be modular so that some Hawken students may choose to spend their high school careers in University Circle while others may join for a semester or two. Mastery School of Hawken students will have the opportunity to access extracurricular offerings at Gates Mills, including athletics and performing arts.

How do we know this will work?

For more than a decade, Hawken has created nationally recognized programs that place students in the real world and engage them in solving authentic problems: Entrepreneurship, Engineering, Intensives, and our freshman PHD (Physics, Humanities, and Design) class – examples of what we call “macro” courses.

Doris Korda, former associate head of Hawken School and current CEO of
Korda Institute for Teaching was the principal architect of Hawken Entrepreneurship program and the signature MACRO courses, as well as a critical coach/designer with the Hawken faculty of many of the Intensive courses. Korda’s methods of teaching and learning have been successfully implemented in innovative school programs that are transforming students around the world. Her curriculum is the foundation of the educational and instructional framework of the Mastery School. Korda is continuing to work with the leadership to help design the Mastery School’s curriculum and to coach its teachers.
 
Method in Action: Hawken’s globally acclaimed Entrepreneurship Course


What exactly is Mastery?

Mastery is the bold notion that learning should be deep, enduring, creative, transferable and, most importantly, used to solve complex problems in the world.

The Mastery School of Hawken is built around three overarching educational concepts:

Courses and programs organized around real world problem solving.
A mentorship approach to instruction allowing for more project-based and personalized learning.
An assessment model that leads students to learn deeply and persist to mastery.




Real World Problem Solving

Students will hone their creative, collaborative, and critical thinking skills by solving real problems for real people. Within walking distance of the Mastery School of Hawken are more than 200 non-profit organizations and businesses, many of which are eager to let high school students work with them on some of their challenges. We believe there is no better location in the Midwest than University Circle/Glenville for this type of learning.




Mentorship Approach

Because students are naturally curious and collaborative, they learn best when they are actively engaged and supported in work that matters. Research shows that students thrive when placed with a caring mentor who will guide them in meaningful learning. At the Mastery School of Hawken, students will be active learners who truly master content and skills while solving real-world challenges under the guidance of our expert teachers and professionals. Doris Korda, former associate head of Hawken School and current CEO of Korda Institute for Teachingis continuing to work with the leadership and faculty to help design the Mastery School's curriculum and to coach its teachers.




Assessment Model

Mastery School of Hawken students will be given time to practice, room to fail, feedback to improve, and opportunities to persist to mastery. They will earn credit only when they demonstrate mastery of the skills, knowledge, and abilities they need to be truly educated and prepared. We will use a mastery crediting system attached to a robust electronic Mastery Transcript that reflects the unique skills, strengths, and interests of each learner.

Click here to learn more about the Mastery Transcript.




Preparation for College and Beyond

Mastery-based learning is engineered for college admission, college success, and a life of purpose in the real world. In just one year, more than 70 colleges and universities – including many of the most selective in the country – announced their support of mastery-based learning and transcripts. In addition, more than 230 public and private schools have committed to the Mastery Transcript Consortium, founded by Hawken and its Head of School, D. Scott Looney.

The Mastery School of Hawken will prepare students for the demands of college and the complexities of the real world by cultivating:
  • problem-solving skills
  • deep, enduring, and useful knowledge
  • intellectual curiosity
  • a collaborative work ethic
  • confident communication skills
  • agency and resilience
  • respect for one another








Admissions Standards & Affordability

  • Admissions standards will remain consistent with those for Hawken’s Gates Mills Upper School campus.
  • We are committed to making this new high school affordable and accessible with a lower tuition than most private schools and generous financial aid.
  • With $9.2 million awarded to 43 percent of the student body in the 2018-2019 school year, Hawken has the largest financial aid budget of any private school in Ohio.
Questions? See FAQs below or call the Admission Office at 440.423.2955

Introducing the Director of the Mastery School of Hawken

Julia Griffin

Julia Griffin holds an undergraduate degree in political theory from Harvard University and a master’s degree from the Bread Loaf School of English at Middlebury College. A humanities and English teacher at Hawken since 2003, Julia has taught Humanities 9 and 10, U.S. History, and American Studies and co-founded the Peer Leadership program at the Upper School. She has also designed and taught Intensive classes on a broad range of topics including Shakespeare in performance; race, gender, and class in America; medieval Europe; Greek tragedy; and immigration. As chair of the Humanities Department, Julia led her team in designing a new Humanities 10 course and oversaw the creation of the Humanities 9 Lab. 
 
Julia’s responsibilities as assistant director of the Upper School for teaching and learning have included faculty recruitment and hiring as well as oversight of the Intensive program and curricular innovation. One of her many strengths is working with teachers and department chairs to develop engaging, challenging, interdisciplinary Intensives and “macro” classes that connect students to their community and the world.
 
Julia subscribes to John Dewey’s notion that “education is a process of living, not a preparation for future living,” and comments that her goal as a teacher is “to help each student discover and cultivate their unique strengths in order to make a difference in their community.”

Frequently Asked Questions



About the Mastery School

List of 11 frequently asked questions.

  • What is Mastery?

    According to Grant Wiggins, an internationally recognized expert on assessment, “Mastery is effective transfer of learning in authentic and worthy performance. Students have mastered a subject when they are fluent, even creative, in using their knowledge, skills, and understanding in key performance challenges and contexts at the heart of that subject, as measured against valid and high standards.” We want students to “persist to mastery” rather than just move on when the semester is done. The Mastery School will consider mastering the learning goal as the fixed variable and time as the flexible variable.
  • What are the distinguishing features of the Mastery School?

    The Mastery School features three main concepts:
    • Courses and programs organized around real-world problem solving
    • A mentorship approach to instruction, allowing for more project-based and personalized learning
    • An assessment model that leads students to learn deeply and persist to mastery
    The Mastery School model uses a “place-based” approach, taking full advantage of the rich and diverse range of partners and locations within the University Circle/Glenville neighborhoods.
  • Why now?

    Hawken has been working toward the Mastery School for more than ten years, beginning with the purchase of a property in University Circle in 2007. Since then, we have opened the Gries Center for Service and Experiential Learning in 2010, launched Intensives in 2010, and initiated Entrepreneurship (an example of what we call “macro” courses) in 2013. We have been having serious conversations about this with the faculty and Board since 2014. We’re thrilled to now have the opportunity to launch the Mastery School of Hawken in University Circle.
  • Where will Mastery School of Hawken students spend their time?

    Mastery School students will be on the Magnolia Drive campus and out-and-about in University Circle most of the time; on occasion, they will be on the Gates Mills campus.
  • What is the ratio of Mastery School teachers to students?

    During the first few years, we anticipate “over-resourcing” the Mastery School to insure that the curriculum is developed well and that we have content expertise across the range of disciplines. Once the school is fully enrolled, we anticipate a student/teacher ratio of about 10:1.
  • Are we partnering with other institutions?

    Yes. The only way to achieve the Mastery School goal of organizing school around real-world problem solving is to find partner organizations with problems they are willing to let high school students try to solve. This will be central to our program design, and the specifics of these partnerships will develop and evolve along with the curriculum.
  • Can students enrolled in the Mastery School transfer to the Gates Mills campus and vice versa?

    Yes. This will be considered one conjoined high school in two locations by Hawken, the Ohio High School Athletic Association, and the state of Ohio. A student will be able to change primary campus location in any given year, as he or she is already a Hawken student. We will expect the student and parents to consult with the administration and faculty regarding the feasibility of program moves; this will be subject to space availability at the time.
  • Will there be a different Hawken transcript?

    Yes, the Mastery School will use what is called a “Mastery Transcript.” In 2016, Head of School Scott Looney and Hawken School founded the Mastery Transcript Consortium to organize like-minded schools in an effort to change the high school transcript presented to colleges and employers.The goal is to replace grades, Carnegie units (credits), and content-labeled courses on the transcript with Mastery Credits, which are specific learning targets earned through submission of a portfolio of best work and feedback. These mastery credits will include traditional content (algebraic reasoning) and academic skills (creative writing) as well as credit for social-emotional skills (persistence, resilience, leadership, etc.). This organization now has more than 280 schools - public, private, and parochial - from 23 different countries and is supported by a staff of 11, working together to make this transcript a reality. There are now more than 100 colleges and universities, including many of the most selective colleges, who have gone on record saying that they will accept the Mastery Transcript and that students will not be disadvantaged by a different transcript.
  • What is the Administrative & Faculty Structure?

    The director of the Mastery School is Julia Griffin, formerly the assistant director of the Upper School for teaching and learning at the Gates Mills campus. Rasa Drane is the director of admission for the Mastery School. As the Mastery School enrollment grows, we will add a few more administrative positions, although many of the administrative duties may by hybridized with teaching positions. The founding faculty will consist of eight people (to cover the disciplines) for approximately 40 first-year students.
  • How are we partnering with Doris Korda, CEO of Korda Institute for Teaching (former associate head at Hawken) on curriculum design and teaching training?

    Former Associate Head of School Doris Korda will work with the leadership and faculty at Hawken to help design the school's curriculum and to train and coach teachers. As the principle architect of Hawken's Entrepreneurship program and as a coach who worked collaboratively with Hawken faculty members to design numerous Intensive and Macro courses, Korda will be working with Mastery School teachers and administrators to teach them methods she has developed to transform teaching and learning. Korda believes that students learn best when presented with real world problems to solve and when given the tools and skills they need to achieve personal growth and success. She has since founded the non-profit Korda Institute for Teaching, whose mission is to lead school-wide change in public and private educational institutions all over the world.
  • Are we partnering with other schools?

    Yes, we anticipate developing relationships with the schools and educational organizations in the Mastery School neighborhood over time, as the program and curriculum are being developed.


Student Life

List of 5 frequently asked questions.

  • Can Mastery students be part of athletics/clubs/theater/choir? What will transportation look like for these?

    Yes. For students who want to participate in Gates Mills co-curriculars, we plan to structure the Mastery School academic day to allow time for students to get to that campus for practices, rehearsals, and meetings. There will also be some co-curricular offerings on the University Circle campus, so we do not know what proportion of Mastery School students will engage in after school activities on the Gates Mills campus. We will run an activities bus from University Circle to Gates Mills and back each day.
  • Will there be separate Performing Arts and Fine Arts programming?

    Yes. There are a host of extraordinary performing and fine arts programs in University Circle with whom we hope to develop partnerships and programming. We anticipate that students from both campuses will have access to these new partnerships in University Circle and that the Mastery School students will have some access to the offerings at Gates Mills.
  • Will the Mastery School have its own clubs/activities?

    Yes. These will be developed by the faculty and students to take advantage of University Circle’s unique setting. Given the smaller student body at the Mastery School, there will be fewer clubs and activities than at the Gates Mills campus.
  • What student leadership opportunities will be there? Will there be a Student/Faculty Senate, Integrity Council, stewardship? What about a Peer Leadership program?

    One of the central goals of the Mastery School is to develop in students a deep sense of agency and voice. It is therefore crucial that students play a wide range of key leadership roles within the community. The first generation of students and faculty will determine and design student leadership structures and opportunities. Rather than simply replicating programming at Gates Mills, we will re-envision the goals and come up with solutions that may or may not resemble the current Gates Mills structures.
  • Will there be an Advisory system?

    Yes. In fact, given how personalized the pace will be and how individualized the curriculum pathways will be for each student, the Mastery School will devote a significant part of the schedule to one-on-one advisor/teacher time for students. Teachers will function as guides for students, helping to build their learning targets, projects, and curricular choices and will be the liaison for parents to insure alignment between the student plan/schedule and parent hopes.  
 
 

College Acceptance

List of 4 frequently asked questions.

  • How will colleges come to understand the Mastery School?

    Hawken School is well-known by the most selective colleges, and as the founder of the Mastery Transcript Consortium (which is becoming increasingly well-known and accepted among colleges), we will not surprise colleges with the launch of the Mastery School. In fact, more and more colleges are moving toward project and problem-based learning themselves, so this approach will likely feel familiar and exciting to them.

    The current Upper School has become a leader among innovative schools, so we have already become good at articulating the advantages of our unique programming (Intensives, Entrepreneurship, Engineering, Integrated Service Learning, etc.) Since the Mastery School is a scaling and deepening of these current practices, we are confident we can tell the story.

    Most of the top colleges visit Hawken’s Gates Mills campus, and once we have juniors and seniors on the University Circle campus, we anticipate they will stop there as well.
  • How can you get into a good college without grades?

    It is a little known fact that students without grades are admitted to the most selective colleges all the time. There are a number of non-graded high schools and international schools as well as home-schooled students who apply without grades.

    In 2015, before Hawken School launched the Mastery Transcript Consortium, we commissioned a research study of college outcomes for non-graded high school by  Hanover Research. This research study, Benchmarking Schools with Alternative Transcripts concluded:

    Schools that do not use traditional letter grade-based systems of student evaluation nonetheless exhibit strong records of placing students in well-regarded colleges and universities.”

    “College counselors and other administrators note that even the largest state universities, such as Ohio State University and the University of California system, will consider and accept students without GPAs, class ranks, or letter grades.”

    “A number of (non-graded) schools in this report suggest that the absence of traditional indicators of student performance on their transcripts gives their students an important advantage in the admission process.”

    “…Students gain admission to their ‘reach’ schools at a higher than expected rate because of the way the school’s transcript forces admission officers to more thoroughly read through the student’s application materials. That is, admission officers cannot reduce students with alternative transcripts to letter grades, GPA, or class ranks; they must get to know the student in a more comprehensive fashion.”
  • Where are we in the process of getting the top colleges ready to accept these students with a mastery transcript?  

    Head of School Scott Looney and Hawken School founded the Mastery Transcript Consortium to organize like-minded schools into an effort to change the high school transcript presented to colleges and employers. The goal is to replace grades, Carnegie units (credits), and content-labeled courses on the transcript with mastery credits, which are specific learning targets earned through submission of a portfolio of best work and feedback. These mastery credits will include traditional content (i.e. algebraic reasoning) and academic skills (i.e. creative writing) as well as credit for social-emotional skills (persistence, resilience, leadership, etc.). This organization now has more than 280 schools - public, private, and parochial - from 23 different countries and is supported by a staff of 11, working together to make this transcript a reality. There are now more than 80 colleges and universities, including many of the most selective colleges, who have gone on record saying that they will accept that mastery transcript and that students will not be disadvantaged by a different transcript. In fact, we think that students in the Mastery School may have an advantage in the college process due to the uniqueness of their journeys and stories.
     
    The Mastery Transcript Consortium is just one player in a much bigger movement toward competency/proficiency/personalization that is picking up steam across the globe. Increasingly, the world is recognizing that a one-size-fits-all approach to schedules and curriculum does not work well for most students and is not producing students who are ready for the challenges of the real world. In fact, employers across most sectors report a dissatisfaction with the preparedness of college graduates, even those coming from the most selective universities.
  • Will the Mastery School use the current college counseling office?

    The Mastery School will, eventually, have its own college counselor, who will report to and be trained by Hawken’s director of college counseling. As we will likely begin with 9th graders, we will not have a college counselor in year one and therefore will rely on our current staff for advice and support; but as students move toward 11th grade, we will add a full-time college counselor.

About the Campus

List of 4 frequently asked questions.

  • Why University Circle?

    University Circle is an extraordinary neighborhood, perhaps unique in the greater Midwest. It provides a host of opportunities and world-class intellectual capital, all within walking distance of the Mastery School. Its proximity to the historic neighborhood of Glenville affords us the chance to deepen the connections we have built there since the opening of the Gries Center in 2010. Visit the University Circle website to see just how many amazing organizations and programs will be accessible to our students.
  • How is the Mastery School integrated with other University Circle resources?

    The Mastery School curriculum is built around working together to solve real problems in the community. Within walking distance of Magnolia Drive are more than 200 non-profit organizations and businesses, many of which are willing to let high school students work on some of their challenges. While the Gates Mills campus has many advantages, its location requires students to travel in order to engage in real-world problem sets that extend beyond those found in our suburban/rural setting. Place-based learning requires a location that is complex, interdependent, and varied. We believe there is no better location in the Midwest than University Circle/Glenville for this type of learning.
  • What about athletics?

    We plan to structure the Mastery School academic day to allow students who want to participate in Gates Mills co-curriculars time to get to that campus for practices, rehearsals, and meetings. There will also be some co-curricular offerings on the University Circle campus, so we do not know what proportion of Mastery School students will engage in after school activities on the Gates Mills campus. The Mastery School campus on Magnolia Drive does not have any athletic facilities.
  • Are the dorms for exchange students?

    Hawken has been considering adding a boarding program since 2012, but the sudden availability of a dorm on this campus accelerated this discussion. We envision this dorm will be used for several purposes: bringing international students to Hawken, giving access to the Mastery School and Upper School to students outside of Cleveland, and allowing distant alumni children to attend. We do not anticipate dedicating the dorm spaces to just one part of Hawken. We plan to open the boarding program in the fall of 2021.
 
 

Admissions: Application & Enrollment

List of 7 frequently asked questions.

  • Is the tuition the same for the Mastery School and the Gates Mills campus?

    No. The tuition for the Mastery School is lower. The Mastery School of Hawken has a lower operational overhead due to a much smaller physical plant cost and different staffing model. The Mastery School’s tuition is being set at about 75% of the Upper School tuition. We are also dedicated to making the Mastery School accessible to lower-income students from the city of Cleveland and have built a significant number of full scholarships into the business model.
  • Will the admission standards be the same?

    Yes. We will use the same application and have the same standards. However, there may be some additional process for students considering the Mastery School to insure they are aligned with the different type of learning this new program espouses.
  • When is it opening?

    The Mastery School will open in August of 2020. As this is a conjoined school with the Upper School, the Mastery School will follow the same calendar. Daily schedules will be different, but the yearly calendar will be largely the same.
  • Can a student choose which campus they want to attend?

    Yes. Current students will be given a window of time to indicate their interest in attending the Mastery School (or vice versa), and they can change programs with the consensus of their parents and the school administration. Students who apply will be given the opportunity to indicate their interest in being considered for admission to one or both campuses.
  • Will this school be for a different type of student?

    No. While this program will be significantly different from our current program, we anticipate that choice will largely be a matter of taste and approach. For example, a restaurant would not assume that their offerings were for a “certain type” of customer, only that people have different appetites and preferences.
  • What is the projection for number of students at the Mastery School?

    The Mastery School is being designed to have between 140 and 220 students, with the current best estimate being between 160-180 students.
  •  If this is a start-up, will the first students have to go through a lot of changes?

    As pioneers, the first cohort of students at the Mastery School will no doubt be faced with some changes and challenges; they will also have a unique set of opportunities for leadership and for co-designing of aspects of the school culture and student programming. Since the school curriculum is built on methods that have been refined at Hawken and beyond over the last decade, we are confident that our first generation programming will be strong and will become even stronger over time.

Q&A for Current Families

List of 12 frequently asked questions.

  • Are Hawken Upper School in Gates Mills and the Mastery School integrated?

    Yes, but not completely. The students at the Mastery School will have a different schedule from the students on the Gates Mills campus during the rotation periods, but during the Intensive periods, Hawken will become one big school with a shared schedule. Intensives and co-curriculars will be integrated for the most part, and some students from the Gates Mills campus may choose to take a semester at the Mastery School. Some students will spend most of their time on either the University Circle or Gates Mills campus; some will spend a good deal of time on both campuses.
  • Why not implement mastery programming at the Gates Mills Campus?

    One of the central ideas of the Mastery School is for students to spend most of their time working on authentic, real-world problems. Within walking distance of Magnolia Drive are over 200 non-profit organizations and businesses, many of which are willing to let high school students work on some of their challenges. While the Gates Mills campus has many advantages, our suburban/rural setting limits the real-world problem sets to those found in the natural world. Place-based learning depends upon the location being complex, interdependent, and varied. We believe there is no better location in the Midwest than University Circle/Glenville for this type of learning.
  • Is this for new students or current Hawken students?

    Both. Current Hawken students in grades 8 and below will have an opportunity to choose between the current Upper School and the Mastery School of Hawken and will not need to apply for admission. Given that the admission standards for both programs are the same, new students can apply for admission to the Mastery School, the Upper School, or both.
  • Why now?

    Hawken has been working toward the Mastery School for more than ten years, beginning with the purchase of a property in University Circle in 2007. Since then, we have opened the Gries Center for Service and Experiential Learning in 2010, launched Intensives in 2010, and initiated Entrepreneurship (an example of what we call “Macro” courses) in 2013. We have been having serious conversations about this with the faculty and Board since 2014. We’re thrilled to now have the opportunity to launch the Mastery School of Hawken in University Circle.
  • Will there be program changes to the current Upper School?

    Yes. Students at the current Upper School will benefit directly from the addition of the Mastery School in the following ways:
    • There will be a larger catalog of Intensive courses to choose from, as the Mastery School faculty will be adding new Intensives.
    • The Mastery School semesters (rotations) are designed to be modular so that a student from the Gates Mills campus will be able to take a semester program at University Circle and then return to Gates Mills afterwards. We will be creating our own set of semester programs (like the Island School or the Mountain School) only at University Circle.
  • Will the Lower, Middle, and Upper Schools still be able to use the Gries Center?

    Yes. The existing divisions of Hawken will continue to have priority use of the Gries Center. There are enough new buildings for the Mastery School to operate without use of the Gries Center.
  • What if the Mastery School takes enrollment away from the Upper School?

    Given the extraordinarily strong enrollment demand for Hawken right now (about three applicants for every Upper School seat), we believe we can manage our enrollment on both campuses.
  • Will the Upper School eventually become a Mastery School?

    Perhaps - but likely not for a while, if ever. We believe that students and families should have choices. Elements of the Mastery School curriculum and approach that prove extremely effective may be adopted on the Gates Mills campus over time. Should these programs prove to be popular with the vast majority of the Hawken community, it is possible that the Mastery School and Upper School will someday be completely aligned. However, it is also possible that there will be a balance of demand for the two complementary, but different, approaches. We will listen to our community, and time will tell.
  • Will the Mastery School “steal” the best faculty from the Upper School campus?

    No. The founding team will be small and will consist of faculty hired from outside the school as well as current faculty. Given that Gates Mills students will have access to University Circle semester programming and Intensives, they have not “lost” those faculty members. Eventually, we hope that faculty from both campuses may cycle through teaching on each campus for periods of their career, enriching their teaching and energizing the curriculum at both campuses.
  • Is the Mastery School of Hawken financially sustainable?

    Like the Birchwood School of Hawken, the Mastery School will maintain a discrete and balanced budget once it is up and running. There will be both start-up and capital expenses to get the new school to a balanced budget, and those expenses will be covered by philanthropy. It is our hope to build a specific endowment for the Mastery School over time. In addition, we hope to attract philanthropy to support full scholarship offerings for students from Cleveland.
  • Who is funding the acquisition of the buildings?

    The capital and start-up expenses of this new school will be funded through philanthropy. Once established, the Mastery School will maintain a discrete and balanced budget.
  • Will resources be spread too thin?

    The Mastery School of Hawken will have its own administration and faculty, and they are being hired one year in advance of their eventual work at the Mastery School. The cost of these additional positions will be carried in the discrete Mastery School budget; any deficit that occurs during the start-up phase will be covered by philanthropy and will not affect the current Hawken operational budget. Hiring faculty one year in advance will allow them time to acclimate to Hawken, build their curriculum, and contribute to the current Upper School before they dive into their work in University Circle. There will be a need for the current senior administration to devote time and energy to insuring that the Mastery School launches well and achieves a sustainable position. Fortunately, this senior leadership team has a great deal of practice and capacity for leading notable change while ensuring the day-to-day operations run smoothly.
An independent, coeducational, college preparatory day school, toddler through grade 12

Lower & Middle Schools, 5000 Clubside Rd, Lyndhurst, OH 44124
Birchwood School of Hawken, 4400 West 140th Street, Cleveland, OH 44135 

Upper School, PO Box 8002 (12465 County Line Rd), Gates Mills, OH 44040
Mastery School of Hawken, 11025 Magnolia Dr, Cleveland, OH 44106

Gries Center, 10823 Magnolia Dr, Cleveland, OH 44106

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